Wednesday and Thursday, September 21 and 22, 2016 (Fort Camping, Brae Island Regional Park, Fort Langley, BC)

Wednesday we both had things we wanted to get done around the trailer, but first we thought we'd get out for some exercise...so we hopped on the bikes and headed off across the river to the trail to Derby Reach.

A close-up of Mount Baker...
This time, instead of continuing on to the campground, we stopped at the Heritage Park...a 4.6 km (2.85 mile) bike ride. It has been a few years since we have stopped here. We checked out the heritage site...

Derby Reach Park was, at one time, the original site of Fort Langley, during the early 1800s. The fort operated as a Hudson's Bay Trading Post dealing in furs, canning and farming goods. The historic fort, since then, has moved south 12 kilometres to its new location where it is on display as a Historic Site of Canada.

Vancouver history is still on display in the Derby Reach Regional Park. There is currently a plaque and cairn recognizing the original site of Fort Langley, the Houston House and the Karr/Mercer Historic Barn. 
The Heritage Area includes historic sites, a day use picnic area, Derby Bluff sightseeing viewpoint, interpretive signs and some washrooms.

Built in 1909 by Alexander Houston, the Houston Residence is important for its historic significance in terms of its association with the Houston family, its location, and the period in which it was built. It is also an important example of a community-led restoration that combined the resources of the Langley Heritage Society and the Greater Vancouver Regional District.

The Houstons were an important family in British Columbia's history. Alex's father, James, is credited for being the first European to discover gold along the Fraser River, the first independent farmer in the Fraser Valley, one of 33 men to petition the government for an incorporation of the district, and one of the first councillors when Langley was incorporated as a District in 1873.
Alex took over the family cattle and dairy farming business in 1902 (after the death of his father). He was the only son of James and was himself an important pioneer in the Derby area. His family was very active in the community until the 1950's, having established and hosted the community May Day celebrations and donating land for a commemorative cairn across the street from his house, marking the site of the first Fort Langley. 
The farmsite stands on what was originally land occupied by the first Hudson's Bay Company Fort (1827) and later by the Townsite of Derby (1859). It is a focal point for Derby historical interpretations.
The Houston farmsite reminds visitors that resource-based industries found throughout the province (mining, logging and fishing) were only some of the major forces shaping British Columbia in the 19th and early 20th centuries. The resource-based industries were comprised primarily of single men, while the small farms were comprised of families. Small-scale family farms like this one provided an economic base for the industries mentioned above, and they provided the social stability that was necessary for a growing colony.

With the bikes locked up, we found the trailhead for Houston Trail, a 4 km (2.5 mile) loop. We came across a garter snake sunning himself...

The trail makes its way through forested land along a gravel trail that sits above boggy terrain and mud...

See me in the tree. This tree looks like it started out growing out of a nurse stump that has since decayed away...
This tree is covered in ferns...

Unusual growth pattern...
After a great walk through the forest, we rested at a picnic table for a bit before getting on our bikes again and riding home.

Well, we certainly got our exercise this morning...before heading out, we had also done our resistance exercises! My knees (particularly my left knee) were screaming at me...what the heck was all that?! LOL

The rest of the afternoon was spent doing some chores...I did laundry and cleaned inside, while Steve did a little maintenance work on the boat loader. The motor has sounded laboured the last few times we've used it so he wanted to clean all the wire connections from the control box to the motor. Steve doesn't want to load the boat until we get a few miles on the truck to see if we still have a squeal issue with the truck.

Thursday morning we were up and out shortly after 9:00...on our way to Abbotsford and the Snowbird RV Show. As expected the squealing noise reared it's ugly head again just as we were nearing the Tradex Centre. Will this ever end!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Steve called Dave at Goldkey and gave him the good news. They agreed that we should put a few more miles on it to create a soot trail so they can pinpoint the leaky area.
Seminar area...

 I kinda like this Newmar Class A motorhome...

It has two bathrooms...this is the en suite...
 Interesting...
A few hours later, we had seen everything and were on our way back out to the truck. It was nice checking out the RV's on display but we really didn't see a fifth-wheel with a floor plan that we liked better than ours.

Since we were in Abbotsford, we decided to go to Costco to fill our propane tanks...and grab a bite to eat. We made a stop at the new Cabela's store...without any success in finding anything for our Africa trip. We are looking for a couple of safari-type hats...they had some Tilley hats, but we really don't want to pay the $85 each for them. Hopefully, we can find some similar type ones that are a lot less costly! Too bad we didn't get them when we were in Quartzsite last winter!


Tuesday, September 20, 2016 (Fort Camping, Brae Island Regional Park, Fort Langley, BC)

This morning as we were having our coffee, Steve noticed a motorhome leaving the campground and it had "Kellogg Show" written on the back of it...so he 'googled' it. Turns out it is a family of 14 (OMG 12 kids!) living and travelling full-time. A little while later, they were being interviewed on the morning news...I guess they are here for the Snowbird RV Show. I just can't imagine that many people living in a motorhome!

Today we decided to take advantage of having the courtesy car and drive into downtown Vancouver to Canada Place. Since first seeing the ads on TV for "Fly Over Canada" we have wanted to see it, so I went online, purchased tickets (10% discount online) and we headed off. 

It was a beautiful sunny day! We're approaching the Port Mann Bridge that goes over the Fraser River...
Approaching downtown Vancouver....
...and Canada Place...
Now we had to find a parking spot...we ended up driving under Canada Place and into a parkade under The Shaw Tower.
We emerged up onto the street, just down from Canada Place.






FlyOver Canada is an amazing virtual flight ride in which you will “take off” into a huge domed screen to enjoy a breathtaking flight across Canada’s most spectacular sights. You will be seated in a suspended chair, with your feet dangling, in front of a impressive 4-storey spherical screen. The special effects including wind, mist and scents, combined with the chair’s motion, will make you feel like you’re truly soaring.

Although short and a little pricey at $20.50 each, it was an awesome experience and we would highly recommend it!

After the show, we walked around the area taking more pictures of the beautiful Vancouver Harbour on this sunny day...

Nice ride...
The Olympic Cauldron -
Thousands upon thousands came to see the majestic Cauldron lit during the 2010 Winter Games. With the Games complete, the Cauldron remains as a permanent landmark on the Jack Poole Plaza.

At 32.8 ft (10 m) tall and set against a beautiful mountain and harbour backdrop, the Cauldron continues to attract visitors and locals alike. More importantly, it’s a reminder of our city’s extraordinary Olympic experience and demonstrated ability to host large, complex, international events.
Busy Vancouver Harbour...



The Digital Orca sculpture acts as a sculptural conduit that allows the viewer to travel in time between the past and the future, also allowing the viewer to marvel along the way at the people and activities that created Vancouver’s thriving harbour culture. The sculpture also addresses the massive changes currently reshaping the economy of the Province.

Through the act of pixelizing an orca whale in three dimensions - a process that creates a crackling and unexpected sensation in the viewers mind - the orca cliché is turned upside down and what we thought we knew well is rendered exciting and new. On closer inspection, the colours and materials used in the sculpture’s surfacing evoke the everyday life of the harbour and the diversity of those workers on the working waterfronts of the Province.
The Artist, David Coupland -
Douglas Coupland grew up and continues to live in Vancouver. His first novel, Generation X, was published in March of 1991. Since then he has published nine novels and several non-fiction books in 35 languages and most countries on earth. He has written and performed for the Royal Shakespeare Company in Stratford, England, and in 2001 resumed his practice as a visual artist, with exhibitions in spaces in North America, Europe and Asia.

On our way downtown this morning, we had received a phone call from Dave at Gold Key Isuzu...they test drove our truck again this morning and there was no squeal. We could pick it up it up anytime. So after we were finished at Canada Place/Vancouver Convention Centre...we found our way back to our car, paid $10.50 for about an hour and a half of parking, and headed back out to Langley.

Before heading home, though, we stopped by Kal Tire to have the front tire (that was repaired last week) re-torqued.

Once home, we decided to get out for a little exercise, so we did a 40 minute powewalk down the trail to Tavistock Point...and then it was time to relax out in the late afternoon sunshine. John and Pat joined us for a bevie...and we enjoyed an hour or so chatting with them.